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NEW ORLEANS VOODOO

NEW ORLEANS STYLE DAY OF THE DEAD

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS WITH SALLIE ANN GLASSMAN

La Source Ancienne Ounfo &
The Island of Salvation Botanica & Magical Pharmacy

Sunday, November 1st
3319 Rosalie Alley
New Orleans, LA.

Followed by potluck supper & procession to the cemetary to feed the dead. Please wear white with a purple headscarf, or black and purple for Gede. Bring a dish (not a blonde) for the people and an offering for the DEAD or GEDE. Gede's tastes tend towards peppers, flat bread, rum, cigars, goats, crosses, gravedigger's tools, black cock feathers, skeletons, sunglasses with one lens, spicy creole foods, and money! He is syncretized with St. Gerard. Or you can bring something your ancestors or loved ones enjoyed in life.

FOR MORE INFO AND RSVP: (504)948-9961

READ AND LEARN MORE ABOUT LAST YEARS DAY OF THE DEAD RITUAL!

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT NEW ORLEANS DAY OF THE DEAD

PLEASE VISIT HERE


HURRICANE CEREMONY X

Public prayer ceremony dedicated to Our Lady of Prompt Succor (who has intervened historically on New Orleans’ behalf when a hurricane has threatened) and Ezili Danto (also associated with Mater Salvatoris and Moumt Carmel) to ask for protection from hurricanes.

When:

Where
: Achade Meadows Peristyle, 3319 Rosalie Alley (off of Rampart, between Piety and Desire)

What to bring in offering:
For Our Lady: flowers, statues, candles, religious pictures, jewelry.
For Danto: Barbancourt Rum, Florida Water, candles, daggers, dolls dressed in red and blue with gold trim or calico prints, spicy black beans, peasant cakes, unfiltered cigarettes, fried pork, white crème de menthe.

What to wear: Please dress in white (the color of purity), with red head scarves, or all red (the color of Petwo rites).

For More Info, call The Island of Salvation Botanica: (504) 948-9961.
http://www.feyvodou.com/

READ ARTICLE FROM LAST YEARS RITUAL

Voodoo (Vodou, Vodoun, Vudu, or Vudun in Benin, Togo, southeastern Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Senegal; also Vodou in Haiti) is a name attributed to a traditionally uten West African spiritual system of faith and ritual practices Like most faith systems, the core functions of Voodoo are to explain the forces of the universe, influence those forces, and influence human behavior. Voodoo's oral tradition of faith stories carries genealogy, history and fables to succeeding generations. Adherents honor deities and venerate ancient and recent ancestors. This faith system is widespread across groups in West Africa. Diaspora spread Voodoo to North and South America and the Caribbean.
CLICKABLE LINK

OWN
AUTHENTIC
NEW ORLEANS
VOODOO
JUJU!
operculum (cat's eye shells) to ward off the evil eye
polished and drilled river stones for healing
vintage buttons
glass beads and objects
abalone shell for good luck
agate (protection gemstone)
Milagros
All parts are sewn --- no glue is added to these pieces.
All Jujus have a hanger.
   

EACH IS A ONE OF A KIND ORIGINAL
SOLD ON A FIRST COME FIRST SERVE BASIS
IF SOMEONE BUYS IT BEFORE YOU THE PERSON WHO BOUGHT IT FIRST GETS IT

Seeing is Believing
Book your Hotel Room in New Orleans Today!



 

Portrait of Marie Laveau
Franck Schneider after George Catlin
c. 1920s
Oil on canvas

Although there is plenty of information about Marie Laveau and her daughter and namesake in the legends and lore of Old New Orleans, known as Marie II, separating the fact from the myth has always been a challenge for those seeking a true history of this famous New Orleans icon. Nearly everything that is known about them originates in the secretive oral tradition of the practitioners of Voodoo and that information has been embellished with hearsay and drama, making an already larger than life persona absolutely formidable in the tales that survive.

Marie Laveau - Voodoo Queen of
New Orleans


The Marie Laveau image by New Orleans' artist, Dimitri Fouquet, of his original oil paintings as featured on Dr. John's
CD "Creole Moon."

Voodoo Queen author, Martha Ward, is quoted in New York Times article on Voodoo:

"Something very real is happening," said Martha Ward, a professor of anthropology at the University of New Orleans who wrote one of the forthcoming books about Laveau. "Americans today are hungry for spiritual fulfillment, and voodoo offers a direct experience with the sacred that appeals to more and more people.

"This is especially visible in New Orleans, which has always been a center of those beliefs," Ms Ward said, "Marie Laveau rules the imagination of this city. People think about her, see her, have visions of her, dream about her, talk to her. I know because these people are showing up on my doorstep almost every day."

from "Interest Surges in Voodoo, and Its Queen," New York Times, November 30, 2003

Martha Ward www.marthaward.net/disc.htm One of the famous above-ground cemeteries of New Orleans is known as St. Louis No. 1, the oldest graveyard in the city. A tall marble and stucco tomb there is a site where devotees frequently leave gifts - flowers, candy, salt, coins, beads, bourbon - for Marie Laveau, the famous voodoo priestess. She still attracts attention, and some people still talk to her. One of these is Martha Ward, an anthropologist at the University of New Orleans, who has written

Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau

(University Press of Mississippi). It is a book from a strange sort of participatory journalism; the author says she has "relied on dreams, intuition, a hyperactive imagination, and funky Voodoo luck." She admits to standing in front of the tomb and hearing Marie laugh when asked "What really happened?" Marie's answer: "Who knows the whole story, and maybe it's better that way." There is such a gumbo of legend and fact here, along with earnest attempts to clear up history and legal agreements that were deliberately made murky in the first place, that calling upon voodoo as a reference source isn't as dicey as it might seem. Ward is a competent guide through confusing social customs of strange times in a strange locale, and she interprets the gaps as carefully as possible. "There's hardly any peg in this whole narrative that's literal, truthful or absolute," she warns, but there is plenty of good storytelling and historical recreations of New Orleans nonetheless.

 

There is a legend that the infamous New Orleans native and Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau ( Leveaux, Lavaux, Le Veau, Levaux ) never died, that, in fact, her spirit lives on in selected female descendents in Her Secret society, and Laveau's faithful are awaiting her return. Jewell Parker Rhodes (Voodoo Dreams, Douglass's Women, Magic City) births a modern day Marie in the second book of the Marie Laveau/Voodoo trilogy, Voodoo Season: a Marie Laveau Mystery.

Marie Laveau and the Devil Baby of Bourbon Street ( Find out more here.)

Marie Laveau

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Orleans Voodoo Queen

MARIE LAVEAU PAGES FOR YOU TO VISIT:

MARIE LAVEAU VOODOO QUEEN (Click here for more.)

A MIDSUMMER CELEBRATION
IN HONOR OF MADAME MARIE LAVEAU A HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS TOURS EXCLUSIVE!! (Click Here for more.)

MARIE LAVEAU STORIES OF OLD NEW ORLEANS (CLICK HERE)

XXX MARKS THE SPOT: DEDICATION OR DESECRATION? CALLING ON THE QUEEN OF THE CITY OF THE DEAD (Click Here for more)

MARIE LAVEAUS' HOUSE OF VOODOO (Click here for more.)

Marie Laveau and the Devil Baby of Bourbon Street ( Find out more here.)

Expert Uncovers Birth Record of Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau



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St. John’s Eve 2007

June 23rd, 7 pm: Sallie Ann Glassman and La Source Ancienne Ounfo celebrate St. John’s Eve with their annual ceremony on the footbridge over Bayou St. John (near Cabrini High School).

Vodou Ceremony
Wear all white and bring a white scarf or rag for your head (It will get dirty.)

Marie Laveau
Bring an offering for Marie Laveau. She likes flowers, blue and white candles, hair ribbons and hair dressing supplies (She was a hairdresser.), Vodou-esque items (Voodoo dolls, potions, gris-gris bags, etc.), or images of Marie Laveau.

St. John’s Eve Eve
the same ceremony will be held Friday June 22nd at 6:30 pm at the International House Hotel, 221 Camp St.
http://www.feyvodou.com/

VIEW 2006 HEADWASHING CEREMONY PICTURES

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2009 Mirliton Festival Pictures in Bywater,
New Orleans

HALLOWEEN 2009
6T'9 Social Aid & Pleasure Club
Parade Pictues

2009 Southern Decadence Festival Pictures in
French Quarter,
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2008 Mirliton Festival Pictures in Bywater,
New Orleans


New Orleans Day of the Dead 2008
Sallie Ann Glassman La Source Ancienne Ounfo & The Island of Salvation Botanica
Voodoo Ritual Pictues


Krewe of Boo 2008
Parade Pictues

HALLOWEEN 2008
6T'9 Social Aid & Pleasure Club
Parade Pictues


2007 Mirliton Festival
Pictures in Bywater,
New Orleans


2007 NEW ORLEANS Southern Decadence
FESTIVAL
2007 Pictures in the historic French Quarter
PARADE PICTURES AND MORE

2007 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ AND HERITAGE FESTIVAL
2007 Pictures in at
The Fairgrounds in
New Orleans



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